[REVIEW] ‘TED LASSO’ or a Smile Means a Lot

During the peak of Christmas season watching, my friend Jen told me about a little show she loved called Ted Lasso. I’m normally not much of a TV person so I put it in the back of my mind and didn’t watch it until this last week. I needed a break from the heady nature of Sundance films, so I decided to give it a shot. Now after watching it, I can add my recommendation to the many, like my friend, who love this charming, sweet and funny show. Ted Lasso is a delight!

In some ways Ted Lasso reminds me of Napoleon Dynamite. Now if you are someone who hates Napoleon Dynamite: hear me out. It doesn’t have the dry humor of NP. The style of comedy is very different. However, they are both carried on the back of extremely likable lead characters who are a weird mixture of both confidence and naivete.

Jason Sudeikis plays Ted as a man who is clearly over his head coaching a sport he’s never played (He is hired as a football coach for British football, which is soccer) and yet he is absolutely convinced that optimism and team spirit will make the team great and win matches. And you know what? He might be right.

After all, these professional players know the game. They’ve been playing it their whole lives. What they need is someone who is going to believe in them and keep them practicing each day. In that regard, Ted Lasso is an ideal candidate for the job!

Sudeikis is so great as Ted, and he brings a vulnerability to a role that might otherwise be a joke. I also loved the rest of the cast including all the players and Nick Mohammed playing the shy Nathan who works for the team and Ted calls ‘Nate the Great’.

Ted builds relationships with every single member of the team and crew and that makes it easy to root for him. We want someone to succeed who cares so much about others. It’s similar to watching Napoleon dance for his friend. We root for him because he is serving others with such delightful abandon.

I also really enjoyed Hannah Waddington as Ted’s tough but sweet boss. She knows hiring Ted is a joke. This is by design to hurt her ex-husband; however, his cheerful ways start to wear even her down. It also doesn’t hurt that Ted brings her delicious biscuits each week for Biscuits with the Boss (biscuits are shortbread in England).

I also really enjoyed Juno Temple as Keeley Jones a model and struggling actress dating the star player. I particularly liked her interactions with Rebecca as the 2 are very different types of women but they learn a lot from each other in the first season.

The most important part of Ted Lasso is its heart. I know I say things like that a lot but it’s true. This show is so good-natured it would be difficult to not love. I am sure there is someone out there who dislikes it but not this critic. I loved it!

Have you seen Ted Lasso? I would love to hear your thoughts. It’s also a quick binge. Only 9 quick 30 minute episodes. You can easily knock it out in one evening. I look forward to season 2!

9 out of 10

Smile Worthy

There is some language in the show and a little bit of sensuality.

[REVIEW] ‘The Baby-Sitters Club’ (2020 Netflix) or How to Adapt Nostalgic Properties Right

Back in the old days when I was in middle school there wasn’t much of a YA reading scene (at least to my knowledge) but there were several popular authors (ala Cynthia Voigt and Judy Blume) and popular series (Sweet Valley High, Nancy Drew) with my favorite being The Baby-Sitters Club by Ann M Martin. What I loved about the series is the independent spirit of the girls forming their own business and also becoming a strong group of friends. It satisfied both my youthful needs for independence and connection in one set of novels. My friends and I even started our own club inspired by the books!

With this history you can imagine my excitement when I heard about the new series on Netflix coming this year. Well, excitement mixed with trepidation after what Netflix did with my beloved Anne of Green Gables in the abhorrent Anne with an E, which I hated. That show lost all the spirit of the novels and the characters in a weird mixture of melodrama and supposed grittiness. What would they do with my Baby-Sitters Club?

THE BABY-SITTERS CLUB

Well, I am delighted to reassure you all that not only is The Baby-Sitters Club a worthy adaptation of our beloved novels but it is one of the best live action family series I’ve seen in a long time. I absolutely loved just about everything they did in this series and I don’t see any reason why other fans won’t also be very pleased with it.

The biggest strength to the series is the writing. Taking inspiration from the novels each of the 5 main girls is granted their own episode or chapter where they are the lead narrator. Kristy played by Sophie Grace is the brainchild behind the club and a very independent young lady that bristles at the thought of her mother remarrying.

Then you have the artistic Claudia (Momona Tanada), free spirited Dawn (Xochitl Gomez), shy Mary Ann (Malia Baker), and sophisticated Stacey (Shay Rudolph). They all face their own unique challenges that feel authentic and real without resorting to unnecessary and overbearing trauma like Anne with an E did.

The conflict is especially impressive when we consider the writers have only 23 minutes to get their lead character’s story across as well as building the over-all narrative of the group.

THE BABY-SITTERS CLUB

I also really enjoyed the casting including Alicia Silverstone as Kristy’s Mom. She walks the tricky balance of defending her own choices while still giving her daughter space to grow and accept the big changes in their lives. Again, it was real and authentic and something anyone can relate with.

THE BABY-SITTERS CLUB

The show is also sweet with great chemistry on the part of all of the girls. You don’t have to be a teenage girl to love this show. If you ever were a teenager or ever faced the toils of growing up you will enjoy it. It’s honest and heart-felt without resorting to the cheap gags or sitcom antics of shows typically made for this age demographic.

MV5BOGI1ZDY4M2UtZGQ4Zi00ZWQxLTkzYzAtNzkxZTdmMzEwMjI1XkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyMjQwMDg0Ng@@._V1_SY1000_CR0,0,666,1000_AL_

There are also characters for younger kids like little Karen Brewer (Sophia Reid-Gantzert) who would go on to receive a spinoff series in the novels and I can see that happening here in The Baby-Sitters Club Little Sister series (they also have graphic novels of the main and Little Sisters series). She’s a funny, strange and superstitious character that smaller children will really enjoy.

THE BABY-SITTERS CLUB

What’s great about a show like The Baby-Sitters Club is it can be appreciated on many different levels. It tackles different issues teens are facing from having your period, to parents splitting up, to bullying but it also can be enjoyed on a basic entertainment level. This is because they took the time to write dynamic interesting characters we can relate to. I can think of so many family home evening discussion you could have with this show while still being very entertained.

As far as flaws the 2 episode arc at the camp was a little more over-the-top and less grounded than the rest of the episodes but I was with fine with it. A few of the side characters dipped into caricature like Claudia’s sister Janine. But in fairness she comes right out of the books and was based on Ann M Martin’s actual relationship with her sister, so I’ll allow it (one classic novel this episode is based on is literally called Claudia and Mean Janine). I also thought Mary Ann’s Dad (Marc Evan Jackson) took me out of the realistic tone and was a bit silly in his neurosis for the show.

THE BABY-SITTERS CLUB

Other than that I absolutely loved The Baby-Sitters Club. It was clearly made with love and I hope that families embrace it and it becomes the hit it deserves to be.

9 out of 10

Smile Worthy

smile worthy